BOC 1012

Credits: .7
Lecture: 6 hrs
Group Exercises: 1 hr
Total: 7 hrs

Prerequisites: None

Class Description: Participants will learn the theory, design, and operational practices for new HVAC equipment technologies being installed in high performance buildings and calculate total cost of ownership to help building owners comply with energy codes and meet building energy management goals. Participants will learn the theory, design and operational practices for energy recovery from air and water source systems to determine applicable methods for capturing heating and cooling energy before it is vented or wasted in their building.

PROJECT: None

Learning Objectives:
At the completion of Energy Efficient Ventilation Strategies and Energy Savings through Energy Recovery a participant will be able to:

  1. Describe HVAC equipment being deployed in high-performance buildings (e.g., condensing boilers, ground-source heat pumps, chilled beams).
  2. Explain advanced control sequences and strategies associated with high-performance HVAC equipment.
  3. Apply specific operations and maintenance techniques to maintain good performance.
  4. Determine the difference between initial cost and total cost of ownership for a piece of equipment.
  5. Add the requirement for total cost of ownership analysis to proposals.
  6. Develop specifications for product and equipment vendors that offer energy-efficient products.
  7. Describe how high-performance equipment can help building owners comply with local and state energy efficiency requirements.
  8. Describe typical utility incentives and tax credits that apply to high-performance heating and cooling equipment.
  9. Describe how high-performance equipment can help building owners meet building energy management goals and policies.
  10. Describe industry awards and certifications, such as LEED, that apply to high-performance equipment.
  11. Describe how and where energy is wasted in a typical building.
  12. Explain the theory of energy recovery from air and water source systems.
  13. List the types of air and water source energy recovery systems.
  14. Implement operational practices for energy recovery from air and water source systems.
  15. Describe the design considerations related to air and water source energy recovery systems.
  16. Describe typical utility incentives and tax credits that apply to implementing energy recovery strategies.
  17. Explain why capturing heating and cooling energy before it is vented or wasted is a cost-effective strategy.
  18. Describe how energy recovery techniques can assist building owners in meeting energy management goals.
  19. Demonstrate the cost effectiveness of energy recovery techniques using energy accounting principles.
  20. Describe how energy recovery strategies can help building owners comply with local and state energy efficiency requirements.
  21. Describe industry awards and certifications (e.g., LEED) that apply to energy recovery strategies.

Textbook:
BOC 1011 –Energy Efficient Ventilation Strategies and Energy Savings through Energy Recovery Handbook, NEEC

Recommended Readings:
Energy Design Resources: http://www.energydesignresources.com/

Special Equipment: None

Evaluation:
Test 100%

Class Outline

1.     Introduction to High Performance HVAC

1.1.  What defines “high performance”?
1.2.  How do high performance systems differ from “common” HVAC systems?

2.     Examples of High Performance HVAC Equipment

2.1.  Condensing boilers
2.2.  Ground source heat pumps
2.3.  Chilled beams

3.     Operations and Maintenance

3.1.  Controls strategies and sequences
3.2.  Maintenance considerations
3.3.  Class exercise #1

4.     Selecting High Performance HVAC Equipment

4.1.  Financial considerations

4.1.1.     Initial cost vs. total cost of ownership
4.1.2.     Utility incentives and tax credits

4.2.  Specifying equipment

4.2.1.     Performance-based specifications
4.2.2.     Total cost of ownership analysis

5.     Energy Performance Considerations

5.1.     How high performance HVAC equipment can help meet energy management goals and policies

5.1.1.     Energy benefits, energy savings compared to common HVAC equipment

5.2.  Industry awards and certifications that may apply (e.g., LEED)
5.3.  Complying with local and state energy efficiency requirements

6.     HP Heating & Cooling Systems Activity: Case Study I

7.     Energy waste: How and where is energy wasted in a typical building

8.     Energy Recovery Theory

9.     Examples of energy recovery equipment

9.1.  Air-to-air

9.1.1.     Heat recovery ventilators (sensible)

9.1.1.1.   Fixed plate
9.1.1.2.   Runaround coil loop

9.1.2.     Energy recovery ventilators (sensible + latent) and Energy Wheels

9.2.  Air-to-water

9.2.1.     Water source heat pump system
9.2.2.     Heat pump water heaters (e.g., dump waste cooling to server room)

9.3.  Water-to-water

10.  Operations and maintenance

10.1.    Controls strategies and sequences
10.2.    Maintenance considerations
10.3.    Class exercise #1 and #2

11.  Selecting energy recovery systems

11.1.    Design considerations

11.1.1.  Seasonal availability of waste heat / cooling
11.1.2.  Proximity of equipment and systems

11.2.    Financial considerations

11.2.1.  Cost-effectiveness
11.2.2.  Utility incentives and tax credits

12.  Energy performance considerations

12.1.    How energy recovery equipment can help meet energy management goals

12.1.1.  Energy benefits related to energy recovery equipment

12.2.  Industry awards and certifications that may apply (e.g., LEED)

13.  Conclusion